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Sunday, May 01, 2011

Managers and Agents

From the first place I looked on "representation"

Acting Agents & Managers


Representative are agents, mangers and sometimes lawyers that work on 5%-20% commission of your salary. Industry professionals such as directors, producers and casting director do not want to talk with the talent in most cases and would prefer to talk with a legal official that acts on the talent's behalf.

The representative job is to submit the talent to casting calls, to book auditions and callsbacks, to negotiate a contract, and to supply the actor with all the information and tools that he needs in order to do a good job.

  THE AGENT'S JOB:

The role of the agent is to find work for actors.  Legitimate, reputable agents will only get paid after an actor has been paid, and the rate is generally 5% - 10% of the actor's gross salary.


While it is not necessary to have an agent to get work, it would serve you well to find an agent as soon as possible.  An agent, with their industry contacts and professional resources, will be able to get you into auditions and interviews that you otherwise may not ever hear about.


In addition to their resources and help in getting you in the door, many agents will also represent you to casting directors, help you in continually developing your career, negotiate your contract for an acting job, as well as protect you and help with any disputes you may have with a producer.  For their services, agents will take a percentage of your gross salary, as well as expect you to be professional and committed to your career.


Since agents are paid only when you get paid, it is in their best interest to keep you working.  For this reason, you should begin your search for an agent as soon as possible, because it only helps to have an ally in your search for acting jobs.


Remember, reputable agents never charge any kind of fees or dues outside of their stated commission charges.  If an agent tells you otherwise, find another one. While it is possible to get work without having an agent, you will find that you get more opportunities when you have representation. 

THE MANAGER'S JOB:


A talent manager, also known as a personal manager, is one who guides the career of artists in the entertainment business. The responsibility of the talent manager is to oversee the day to day business affairs of an artist; to advise and counsel talent about professional matters and personal decisions which may affect their career.The roles and responsibilities of a manager vary slightly from industry to industry, as do the commissions to which the manager is entitled. Music managers duties differ from those who advise actors, writers, directors, etc.
Most acting managers takes 10% - 20% of the performer earnings. Although your contract may be negotiable, the standard contract with a manager is 3 years.
It is best to see if the manager you want to sign with is a member of the Talent Mangers Association
What wikipedia has to say on the "Talent agent"
A talent agent, or booking agent, is a person who finds jobs for actors, authors, film directors, musicians, models, producers, professional athletes, writers and other people in various entertainment businesses. Having an agent is not required, but does help the artist in getting jobs. In many cases casting directors, or other businesses, go to talent agencies to find artists they are looking for.[1] The agent is paid a percentage of the stars earnings (typically 10%). Agents sometimes will be referred to as "10 percenters." There are different regulations that govern different types of agents that are established by artist's unions and the legal jurisdiction in which the agent operates. There are also professional organizations that license talent agencies. Since the decline in viewership in theaters, from the 1950's to 1960's, this caused a monumental shift in how studios would produce films and thus reducing the cost of exclusive and expensive actors. Actors and actresses were working for the studios but were not owned by one major studio entity, they were able to work on within their time and with other studios. Because of this, agents were now seen as an option instead of a necessity. Agents now became third parties that negotiated between studios and clients, this making their services imperative between each party. Since talent agencies are working with lucrative contracts, all talent agencies must be licensed under special sections of the California Labor Code. This entail an agent/s as any “person or corporation who engages in the occupation of procuring, offering, promising, or attempting to procure employment for artist or artists.”[2]
What wikipedia has to say on the "Talent manager"
A talent manager... is an individual or company who guides the professional career of artists in the entertainment industry. The responsibility of the talent manager is to oversee the day-to-day business affairs of an artist; advise and counsel talent concerning professional matters, long-term plans and personal decisions which may affect their career.[1]
The roles and responsibilities of a talent manager vary slightly from industry to industry, as do the commissions to which the manager is entitled. For example, a music manager's duties differ from those managers who advise actors, writers, or directors. A manager can also help artists find an agent, or help them decide when to leave their current agent and identify who to select as a new agent.[2] Talent agents have the authority to make deals for their clients while managers usually can only informally establish connections with producers and studios but do not have the ability to negotiate contracts.
Notice the contrast.

Difference between agents and managers

  • Agents have the authority to make deals for their clients. Managers establish connections with producers and studios, labels and publishers. They also guide the artist's career.
Perhaps in the end I just watched too many episodes of Entourage.

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