pages

Saturday, January 22, 2011

Keith Olbermann versus the New York Post

To commemorate the recent termination of Keith Olbermann from MSNBC's purportedly top-rated show Countdown with Keith Olbermann, I will flash back to the death of political opinionjournalist super-hero Tim Russert and his subsequent memorial service.
MSNBC blowhard Keith Olbermann couldn't even control his temper at a memorial reception for beloved Tim Russert.
Network sources told Page Six Olbermann was furious last week when MSNBC didn't get him a first-class ticket to Washington, DC, for a private service honoring the "Meet the Press" anchor's passing.
The source said Olbermann was screaming into the phone on Tuesday because there were no first-class train tickets available for that day, and he wanted to make sure he would ride first-class on Wednesday. According to the source, Olbermann berated a staffer who was coordinating Wednesday's Kennedy Center memorial by yelling, "You better hope to God there is a first-class train ticket tomorrow."
Our insider elaborated, "MSNBC was dealing with who could come to the private ceremony Tuesday and who couldn't, among the hundreds of people who worked with or for Russert - and Keith was ranting about not getting a first-class ticket."
We're told Olbermann didn't get to Tuesday's ceremony, and went to Washington by car to broadcast from outside the Kennedy Center the next day. An aghast witness there said, "As guests were making their way into the memorial, Keith went apoplectic because there were no ketchup packets at the Kennedy Center."
Olbermann was heard saying outside the service, "this place is going to hell," because his Washington staff couldn't find ketchup packets for lunch at the Center. An NBC insider claimed, however, "Keith did not have lunch at the Kennedy Center and was not eating on the set because he was anchoring a broadcast."
A rep for Olbermann snapped: "Since whatever you're going to print is an outright lie, you can go ahead and write whatever you want. That's on the record and applies to all future items you might make up."

We can assume that the article above was 100% accurate in its portrayal of the notorious egomaniac.  I will not assume that the notorious egomaniac is that disrespectful of Tim Russert nor do all of the components add up to a compelling, realistic narrative.  The Politico tells more:
The NY Post's "Page Six" continues its attack on MSNBC's Keith Olbermann
A network source told "Page Six" that Olbermann "was ranting about not getting a first-class ticket" to Tim Russert's service in Washington D.C. Also, Olbermann "went apopletic" because his staff couldn't find him ketchup packets at the Kennedy Center.

In response, an MSNBC rep just seemed tired of dealing with Murdoch's Post: "Since whatever you're going to print is an outright lie, you can go ahead and write whatever you want. That's on the record and applies to all future items you might make up."
Olbermann knew the item was coming today, and gave "Page Six" reporter Corynne Steindler — who I should disclose is an old friend of mine — the bronze award in his "worst person" run-down last night.
Calling it a "fictional story," Olbermann said he didn't take the train to Washington, but rode in a car both ways. And he ate at Union Station, he said, while only having a Starbucks coffee at the Kennedy Center. (A commenter asks why someone would drive from New York and then eat at Union Station, where Amtrak trains run to).
Don't get me wrong. I don't trust Keith Olbermann. His ego is such that he would surely protect himself at all costs, including the truth yet the story he tells makes so much more sense than what the New York Posts, especially given the exclusive nature of the Post's attack.

To the credit of the New York Post it does include an accusation to itself that it will publish lies. So it may have happened or it may not have but what repercussions should come from this?

No comments: