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Friday, June 26, 2015

no original content for a couple of weeks

Make no mistake. I'm busy. I have thoughts on everything, and may well expand on some mentioned, and minimize others. But I have work to do and unless you want to offer a fresh check for exclusive writing (and believe me, I'm open) then I have work to do elsewhere.  No original content for a couple of weeks.


I'm not apologizing for that.

In the meantime I beg of you, visit a couple of times a week anyway.  I'd like someone to be here when I get back.  I think I have like 3 or may 60 regular readers and I want to keep at least two of them.

No I don't need an excuse to post a photo of Macho Man Randy Savage.

Thursday, June 25, 2015

"Religion and Public Life in America" (IMPRIMIS April 2013 • Volume 42, Number 4)

R. R. Reno is the editor of First Things, a journal of religion in public life. He received his B.A. from Haverford College and his Ph.D. in religious studies from Yale University, and taught theology and ethics at Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska, for 20 years. He is the author of Fighting the Noonday Devil,Sanctified Vision, and a commentary on the Book of Genesis, as well as a number of other books and essays.

The following is adapted from a speech delivered on February 20, 2013, at a Hillsdale College National Leadership Seminar in Bonita Springs, Florida.  

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Donald Trump and Getting Worse

I'm supposed to issue an opinion on Donald Trump's run for the President, or at least my impression on the impression that he deliberately impressed upon the public, for whatever goal or gain possibly manifested in his combed over mind.

(By supposed to, I mean someone posted the question on my personal page on the Facebook, and a young lady "Liked" the question, so I'm obligated to answer).  It is my duty, as both a patriotic American and a gentleman.

But then there was a racially-tuned terrorist attack in Charleston, South Carolina.  I'm unclear on whether the evil bastard was motivated by racial hatred or whether racial hatred was simply a means to fulfill his narcissistic demand for attention.  People will tell through endless punditry that you have to declare a belief in one or the other and then they will mock you for dogmatically attaching yourself to the wrong theory, that is to say what they dogmatically think is wrong.  This is nonsense. We don't read minds.  And evil murderous traitorous monsters are traditionally very hard to read and sympathize with.  What are his motivations?  Political, ideological, or sick, twisted form of personal gain through fame? Naturally in response to his demand for attention, the media cast a spotlight on him like a bunch of chumps.

Because they're chumps.

Thursday, June 18, 2015

"The Dangers of Price Controls" (IMPRIMIS Vol. l No. l May, 1972)

THE DANGERS OF PRICE CONTROLS

by Henry Hazlitt

The first thing to be said about wage and price fixing is that it is harmful at any time and under any conditions. It is a giant step toward a dictated, regimented, and authoritarian economy. It makes impossible arrangements that both sides are willing to agree to. It sets aside contracts that have already been made in good faith. If an employer wishes to give a man a raise in pay, and the man deserves it, he is nonetheless forbidden to do it under the new regulations. This is a grave abridgment of individual liberty.


Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Billy Talent - Red Flag



Cast off the crutch that kills the pain
The Red Flag waving never meant the same
The kids of tomorrow don't need today
When they live in the sins of yesterday

Cast off the crutch that kills the pain
The Red Flag waving never meant the same
The kids of tomorrow don't need today
When they live in the sins of yesterday

Well I've never seen us act like this
Our only hope is the minds of kids
And they'll show us a thing or two

Our only weapons are the guns of youth
It's only time before they tighten the noose
And then the hunt will be on for you

The Red Flag waving never meant the same... no
The Red Flag waving never meant the same

Cast off the crutch that kills the pain
The Red Flag waving never meant the same
The kids of tomorrow don't need today
When they live in the sins of yesterday

Cast off the crutch that kills the pain
The Red Flag waving never meant the same
The kids of tomorrow don't need today
When they live in the sins of yesterday

Like the smallest bee packs a sting
Like a pawn checkmates a King
We'll attack at the crack of dawn

Build a ladder if there's a wall
Don't be afraid to slip and fall
Speak for yourself or they'll speak for you

The Red Flag waving never meant the same... no
The Red Flag waving never meant the same... no!

Cast off the crutch that kills the pain
The Red Flag waving never meant the same
The kids of tomorrow don't need today
When they live in the sins of yesterday

Cast off the crutch that kills the pain
The Red Flag waving never meant the same
The kids of tomorrow don't need today
When they live in the sins of yesterday

Like a fire
Don't need water
Like a jury
Needs a liar
Like a riot
Don't need order
Like a madman
Needs a matter

We don't need them
We all need them
We don't need them
We all need them
We don't need them
We all need them
We don't need them
We all need them

Cast off the crutch that kills the pain
The Red Flag waving never meant the same
The kids of tomorrow don't need today
When they live in the sins of yesterday

Cast off the crutch that kills the pain
The Red Flag waving never meant the same
The kids of tomorrow don't need today
When they live in the sins of yesterday

Cast off the crutch that kills the pain (We don't need them, we don't need them)
The Red Flag waving never meant the same (We don't need them, we don't need them)
The kids of tomorrow don't need today (We don't need them, we don't need them)
When they live in the sins of yesterday (We don't need them, we don't need them)

We don't need them!



Billytalent2cover.jpg

Sunday, June 14, 2015

Flag Day



Today is Flag Day and the day the United States Army was born.

I love the Flag.
The Fourth of July was traditionally celebrated as America's birthday, but the idea of an annual day specifically celebrating the Flag is believed to have first originated in 1885. BJ Cigrand, a schoolteacher, arranged for the pupils in the Fredonia, Wisconsin Public School, District 6, to observe June 14 (the 108th anniversary of the official adoption of The Stars and Stripes) as 'Flag Birthday'. In numerous magazines and newspaper articles and public addresses over the following years, Cigrand continued to enthusiastically advocate the observance of June 14 as 'Flag Birthday', or 'Flag Day'.
On June 14, 1889, George Balch, a kindergarten teacher in New York City, planned appropriate ceremonies for the children of his school, and his idea of observing Flag Day was later adopted by the State Board of Education of New York. On June 14, 1891, the Betsy Ross House in Philadelphia held a Flag Day celebration, and on June 14 of the following year, the New York Society of the Sons of the Revolution, celebrated Flag Day.
Following the suggestion of Colonel J Granville Leach (at the time historian of the Pennsylvania Society of the Sons of the Revolution), the Pennsylvania Society of Colonial Dames of America on April 25, 1893 adopted a resolution requesting the mayor of Philadelphia and all others in authority and all private citizens to display the Flag on June 14th. Leach went on to recommend that thereafter the day be known as 'Flag Day', and on that day, school children be assembled for appropriate exercises, with each child being given a small Flag.
Two weeks later on May 8th, the Board of Managers of the Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Revolution unanimously endorsed the action of the Pennsylvania Society of Colonial Dames. As a result of the resolution, Dr. Edward Brooks, then Superintendent of Public Schools of Philadelphia, directed that Flag Day exercises be held on June 14, 1893 in Independence Square. School children were assembled, each carrying a small Flag, and patriotic songs were sung and addresses delivered.
In 1894, the governor of New York directed that on June 14 the Flag be displayed on all public buildings. With BJ Cigrand and Leroy Van Horn as the moving spirits, the Illinois organization, known as the American Flag Day Association, was organized for the purpose of promoting the holding of Flag Day exercises. On June 14th, 1894, under the auspices of this association, the first general public school children's celebration of Flag Day in Chicago was held in Douglas, Garfield, Humboldt, Lincoln, and Washington Parks, with more than 300,000 children participating.
Adults, too, participated in patriotic programs. Franklin K. Lane, Secretary of the Interior, delivered a 1914 Flag Day address in which he repeated words he said the flag had spoken to him that morning: "I am what you make me; nothing more. I swing before your eyes as a bright gleam of color, a symbol of yourself."
Inspired by these three decades of state and local celebrations, Flag Day - the anniversary of the Flag Resolution of 1777 - was officially established by the Proclamation of President Woodrow Wilson on May 30th, 1916. While Flag Day was celebrated in various communities for years after Wilson's proclamation, it was not until August 3rd, 1949, that President Truman signed an Act of Congress designatingJune 14th of each year as National Flag Day.
I'm not a fan of Flag Day, but I love the Flag. A day where everyone else is reminded to love the flag as well as I is a welcome day indeed.

mice versus elephant

I didn't know the Mythbusters tested this idea until last year. i was surprised. The cartoons were right.



The Mythbusters have mice and they traveled to elephants. And of course Hyneman invoked the Discovery Channel.
One thing that Hyneman has learnt from working on the show is that even the least scientific-sounding experiments can be astounding.
During a test they casually conducted to see if elephants are indeed afraid of mice, as people commonly believe, the Mythbusters team was completely “shocked” about the results.
Hyneman recalls: “We were at a game reserve where we knew elephants would cross a certain path. So we hollowed out a ball of elephant dung, which is quite large, and put one very unhappy mouse in there, tied a piece of monofilament to the dung and put it on the path.
“When the elephant came by, we yanked the string, and the mouse was exposed, and we thought the elephant wouldn’t even notice it and were just hoping that it wouldn’t step on the poor mouse. But what happened was practically like a cartoon, where the elephant came screeching to a stop and seemed almost to tiptoe around the mouse. Our jaws dropped.”
The team then tried again with another ball of dung without a mouse “in case the elephant was just started by animated dung”, but the animal ignored it.
“It’s not science if its not repeatable, so we did the same thing with the dung with another mouse and another elephant, and the exact same thing happened. So even a small story like that without any explosives or chemicals or anything, turned out to be one of our favourite, most surprising kind of things we’ve ever done.”

I love science, actual science, with the repetition. Although I can talk about cosmological stuff with great affection as well.


Friday, June 12, 2015

Ronald Reagan Brandenburg Gate Speech 28th Anniversary

ReaganBerlinWall.jpg
28 years today President Ronald Reagan gave his speech at the Brandenburg Gate, addressing the whole of western civilization, especially the Germans in the audience, but with a special line directed at his Soviet counterpart and his evil empire.

The speech commemorated the 750th anniversary of Berlin, which is difficult to imagine for us dirty Americans, since our nation is relatively young compared to the rest of the western world.  The various nation-states that were once the mother countries of various empires spawned from Europe are all ancient, many centuries older than our shining city.  That explains their many wars over the centuries as well as the longstanding rivalries.  Truth be told the only reason why the European Union exists now is because the cultures that used to own such ambitious globe-spanning empires are now comparatively pathetic and effectively puny; in order to compete or even measure up to the mighty United States they pooled their own interests , just to compete or be relevant on the global scale.  Which of course does not blunt the fact that the greatest world power ends up being the world police, influencing interests and keeping peace for a number of reasons.

Thursday, June 11, 2015

"Calvin Coolidge and the Moral Case for Economy" (IMPRIMIS February 2013 • Volume 42, Number 2)

Amity Shlaes is a syndicated columnist for Bloomberg, a director of the
Four Percent Growth Project at the George W. Bush Presidential Center, and a member of the board of the Calvin Coolidge Memorial Foundation. She has served as a member of the editorial board of the Wall Street Journal and as a columnist for the Financial Times, and is a recipient of the Hayek Prize and the Frederic Bastiat Prize for free-market journalism. She is the author of four books, Germany: The Empire WithinThe Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression, The Greedy Hand: How Taxes Drive Americans Crazy and What to Do About It, and Coolidge.

The following is adapted from a talk given at Hillsdale College on January 27, 2013, during a conference on “The Federal Income Tax: A Centenary Consideration,” co-sponsored by the Center for Constructive Alternatives and the Ludwig von Mises Lecture Series.